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Method Predicts Honey’s Properties

March 3, 2015 | by Univ. of Queensland | News | Comments

Food scientists have discovered a new, low-cost way of accurately predicting the antimicrobial properties of honey using spectroscopy. The new technique could provide a cheaper, more accurate and more practical method of determining the therapeutic properties in honey, benefiting beekeepers, processors and consumers.

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Formation of Aluminum Alloys Causes Battery Failures

March 19, 2015 9:00 am | by National Institute of Standards and Technology | News | Comments

Researchers have imaged the inner workings of experimental solid-state batteries as they charged and discharged while making detailed measurements of their electrochemical health. Their work has helped explain why the batteries rapidly lose performance and suggests a way for improving them.

Automated System Could Produce Vaccines Faster

March 19, 2015 9:00 am | by Max Planck Institute | News | Comments

In the event of an impending global flu pandemic, vaccine production could quickly reach its limits, as flu vaccines are still largely produced in embryonated chicken eggs. Now, researchers are working on a fully automated method for production in cell cultures that could yield vaccines in large quantities in a crisis.

Mother Lemurs Smell of Their Baby’s Gender

March 19, 2015 9:00 am | by Duke Univ. | News | Comments

Dozens of pregnancy myths claim to predict whether a mom-to-be is carrying a boy or a girl. Some say you can tell by the shape of a woman’s bump, or whether she craves salty or sweet. Even ultrasound doesn’t always get it right. But for lemurs, the answer is in the mother’s scent.

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MRS Sees Precancerous Breast Changes

March 19, 2015 9:00 am | by Radiological Society of North America | News | Comments

A magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) technique that monitors biochemical changes in tissue could improve the management of women at risk of breast cancer, according to a new study.  

Old Spectroscopy Tool Enables Quantum Leaps

March 19, 2015 9:00 am | by Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

Physicists have demonstrated "ponderomotive spectroscopy," an advanced form of a technique that was born in the 17th century when Isaac Newton first showed that white light sent through a prism breaks into a rainbow. A new twist on this old tool lets scientists use light to study and control matter with 1,000 times better resolution and precision than previously possible.

Method Can Test Space Dust for Life's Ingredients

March 3, 2015 9:00 am | by Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

While the origin of life remains mysterious, scientists are finding more and more evidence that material created in space and delivered to Earth by comet and meteor impacts could have given a boost to the start of life. Some meteorites supply molecules that can be used as building blocks to make certain kinds of larger molecules that are critical for life.

Researchers Simulate Flu’s Outer Envelope

March 3, 2015 9:00 am | by Biophysical Society | News | Comments

By combining experimental data from X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, cryoelectron microscopy and lipidomics, researchers have built a complete model of the outer envelope of an influenza A virion for the first time. The approach has revealed characteristics about the membrane components that may help scientists better understand how the virus survives in the wild or find new ways to combat it.

Compound-destroying Mineral Holds Implications for Mars

March 3, 2015 9:00 am | by Imperial College London | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that the mineral jarosite breaks down organic compounds when it is flash-heated, this find has implications for Mars research. Jarosite is an iron sulfate and it is one of several minerals that NASA’s Curiosity Mission is searching for, as its presence could indicate ancient habitable environments, which may have once hosted life on the red planet.

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Laser to Help Exoplanet Hunt

March 3, 2015 9:00 am | by Institute of Physics | News | Comments

The hunt for Earth-like planets around distant stars could soon become a lot easier thanks to a new technique. A team of researchers have successfully demonstrated how a solar telescope can be combined with a piece of technology that has already taken the physics world by storm— the laser frequency comb.

Chromatography Techniques: February 2015

February 27, 2015 5:15 pm | Digital Editions | Comments

The February issue of Chromatography Techniques features a cover story on accelerator mass spectrometry, and other features on GC analysis in fracking locations, new USP methods, NIR spec analysis in tablet testing, and more!

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Ultra-high Speed Analysis of New USP Methods

February 20, 2015 11:00 am | by Kenichiro Tanaka and William Hedgepeth, Applications Specialists, Shimadzu Scientific Instruments, Inc., Columbia, Md. | Articles | Comments

Updates to the allowed limits of HPLC and GC parameters enable higher-speed analysis of USP methods than ever before.

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Dual-column GC Tackles POPs

February 20, 2015 10:00 am | by Kristen Parnell and Tim Anderson, Phenomenex, Inc., Torrance, Calif. | Articles | Comments

Dual-column gas chromatography meets the needs of the environmental testing industry by providing fast, accurate separation of multiple halogenated compound classes.

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GC Ensures Integrity of Drinking Water in Fracking Locations

February 20, 2015 9:00 am | by Lee Marotta, Sr. Field Application Scientist, PerkinElmer Instruments, Shelton, Conn., and Robert Thomas, Scientific Solutions, Gaithersburg, Md. | Articles | Comments

Multiple gas chromatography methods are being deployed to monitor a suite of fracking-related contaminants that may be present in drinking water. 

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AMS Transitions From Research to Practice

February 19, 2015 2:00 pm | by Tim Studt, Editor-in-Chief, R&D Magazine | Articles | Comments

Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an analytical technique for measuring isotope ratios with high selectivity, sensitivity and precision. Initially developed more than 75 years ago by Robert Cornog and Luis Alvarez at the Univ. of California, Berkeley, there are now more than 110 AMS systems in 28 countries around the world, mostly at government and university labs, but a few at private companies as well.

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High-magnification Aids FTIR Imaging of Biomedical Tissue

February 19, 2015 1:45 pm | by Mustafa Kansiz (Agilent Technologies), Carol Hirschmugl (Univ. of Wisconsin), Benedict Albensi (St. Boniface Hospital Research Centre) and Catherine Liao and Kathleen Gough (Univ. of Manitoba) | Articles | Comments

As illustrated by experimental results, imaging in high-magnification mode is faster and results in more spectral and spatial detail.

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NIR Spec Delivers Fast Tablet Testing

February 19, 2015 1:00 pm | by Metrohm USA, Riverview, Fla. | Articles | Comments

Near-infrared spectroscopy reduces the amount of time and work needed to test sustained-release tablets, and ensures nondestructive, reliable analysis.

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Damaged DNA May Slow Patrolling Molecule

February 19, 2015 9:00 am | by Univ. of Illinois at Chicago | News | Comments

Sites where DNA is damaged may cause a molecule that slides along the DNA strand to scan for damage to slow on its patrol, delaying it long enough to recognize and initiate repair. The find suggests that the delay itself may be the key that allows the protein molecule to find its target.  

Research Yields New Pathway to Valleytronics

February 19, 2015 9:00 am | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

A potential avenue to quantum computing currently generating quite the buzz in the high-tech industry is valleytronics, in which information is coded based on the wavelike motion of electrons moving through certain 2-D semiconductors. Now, a promising new pathway to valleytronic technology has been uncovered.  

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Herbal Supplements Aren’t What They Claim

February 19, 2015 9:00 am | by Associated Press, Mary Esch | News | Comments

DNA testing on hundreds of bottles of store-brand herbal supplements sold as treatments for everything from memory loss to prostate trouble found that four out of five contained none of the herbs on the label. Instead, they were packed with cheap fillers such as wheat, rice, beans or houseplants.

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Lack of Iron Linked to Alzheimer's

February 19, 2015 9:00 am | by Univ. of Technology, Sydney | News | Comments

Alzheimer's disease is difficult to spot in its early stages, has no effective treatment and no known cure. But, researchers are hopeful their work will make the most common form of dementia easier to diagnose and treat. Their research indicates that iron deficiency may play a significant part in the development of Alzheimer's.

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