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Salamander Skin Holds Key to Quick Healing

September 9, 2014 | by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology | Comments

Salamanders may not be the cuddliest of animals, but they can regenerate lost limbs and achieve amazing recovery of seriously damaged body parts. Now, a new report identifies a peptide from the skin of salamanders that may be the key to unlocking the secret of this amazing wound healing trick in humans.

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Lab Daily

Student Awarded $30,000 for LCMS Methods

October 14, 2014 7:00 am | by Univ. of Massachusetts Amherst

A student who develops new analytical methods using liquid chromatography and gas phase chemistry in mass spectrometry to characterize a group of pharmaceuticals known to be highly heterogeneous has been awarded the 2014-15 Global Fellowship Award from the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention.

Scientists See 'Forbidden' Side of Molecules

October 14, 2014 7:00 am | by Univ. of Basel

Researchers have succeeded in observing the "forbidden" infrared spectrum of a charged molecule for the first time. These weak spectra offer perspectives for extremely precise measurements of molecular properties and may also contribute to the development of molecular clocks and quantum technology.

Graphene Sensor Tracks Cancer Indicators

October 14, 2014 7:00 am | by Institute of Physics

An ultra-sensitive biosensor made from the wonder material graphene has been used to detect molecules that indicate an increased risk of developing cancer. The biosensor has been shown to be more than five times more sensitive than bioassay tests currently in use, and was able to provide results in a matter of minutes.

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MS Technique Spots Food Fraud

October 14, 2014 7:00 am | by ACS

As the UK forms a new crime unit designed to fight food fraud— in response to an uproar last year over horse meat being passed off as beef— scientists from Germany are reporting a technique for detecting meat adulteration.

Mesoamericans Drank Fermented Agave Sap

October 14, 2014 7:00 am | by PNAS

Although in modern societies fermented beverages are associated with socializing, celebration and ritual, in ancient times they were also important sources of essential nutrients and potable water. In Mesoamerica, pulque— an alcoholic beverage produced from the fermented sap of several species of maguey plants— is hypothesized to have been used as a dietary supplement.

Project Probes Plant, Pollinator Partnership

September 18, 2014 7:00 am | by The College of William & Mary

As dwindling populations of monarch butterflies prepared for their annual migration, two undergraduate students spent their summer trying to more deeply understand the plants upon which they rely. They hope their research will help future work by deepening the understanding of evolutionary relationships developed between milkweed and butterflies, beetles, wasps and other insects.

Multilayer-coated Mirrors Set New Energy Record

September 18, 2014 7:00 am | by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Multilayer-coated mirrors, if used as focusing optics in the soft gamma-ray photon energy range, can enable and advance a range of scientific and technological applications. Researchers have demonstrated that very short-period multilayer coatings deposited on super-polished substrates operate efficiently as reflective optics above 0.6 MeV, nearly a factor of two higher than the previous record at 384 keV, set last year by this same group.

Meet Graphene's Cousin: Germanene

September 18, 2014 7:00 am | by Institute of Physics

Dubbed a “cousin of graphene,” germanene— which is made up of just a single layer of germanium atoms— is expected to exhibit impressive electrical and optical properties and could be widely integrated across the electronics industry in the future.

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Meal Time May Impact TB Treatment

September 18, 2014 7:00 am | by European Lung Foundation

The timing of food intake in the early phase of TB treatment could have a negative impact on the effectiveness of TB treatment. A new study suggests that eating food just before taking a TB drug could reduce the effectiveness of the medicine.

Tech Reveals Nanomechanical Surface Traits

September 18, 2014 7:00 am | by Purdue Univ.

A new research platform uses a laser to measure the nanomechanical properties of tiny structures undergoing stress and heating, an approach likely to yield insights to improve designs for microelectronics and batteries.

Method Screens Materials for Organic Solar Cells

September 9, 2014 7:00 am | by American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Researchers have developed a method to screen organic materials for organic photovoltaic cells by charge formation efficiency.

Excavation Unearths Bronze Age Wine Cellar

September 9, 2014 7:00 am | by PLOS ONE

A Bronze Age palace excavation has revealed an ancient wine cellar. Wine production, distribution and consumption are thought to have played a role in the lives of those living in the Mediterranean and Near East during the Middle Bronze Age, but little archaeological evidence about Bronze Age wine is available to support art and documentation about the role wine played during this period.

NMR IDs Fraudulent Organic Food

September 9, 2014 7:00 am | by ACS

A growing number of consumers are willing to pay a premium for fruits, vegetables and other foods labeled "organic," but whether they're getting what the label claims is another matter. Now, scientists studying conventional and organic tomatoes are devising a new way to make sure farms are labeling their produce appropriately.

Initiative Works Toward Breath Test for COPD

September 9, 2014 7:00 am | by NYU Langone Medical Center

A new clinical initiative will determine a breath test’s effectiveness to identify volatile organic compounds in human breath that are biomarkers of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Material Cherry-picks Molecules

August 21, 2014 7:00 am | by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Countless products are based on ethylene, a simple two-carbon molecule, which requires an energy-intense separation process to pluck the desired chemical away from nearly identical ethane. To eliminate the extreme cooling required in the separation, researchers have designed a material with a porous framework that greatly prefers ethylene.

‘Dancing’ Light Advances Cancer Research

August 21, 2014 7:00 am | by Univ. of Cambridge

A new technique that traps light at the nanoscale to enable real-time monitoring of individual molecules bending and flexing may aid in our understanding of how changes within a cell can lead to diseases such as cancer.

Nanoparticles Aid Antibody Purification

August 21, 2014 7:00 am | by A*STAR

Monoclonal antibodies represent the largest and fastest-growing segment of international biopharma. While these therapeutic agents are a boon for global healthcare, productivity constraints pose a serious challenge. Now, researchers have developed a high-capacity method to purify monoclonal antibodies that uses magnetic nanoparticles and also introduces new operating conditions.

Antibacterial Compounds Pose Risks to Fetuses

August 21, 2014 7:00 am | by ACS

As the FDA mulls over whether to rein in the use of common antibacterial compounds that are causing growing concern among environmental health experts, scientists are reporting that many pregnant women and their fetuses are being exposed to these substances.

Test Gauges Purity of Graphene

August 21, 2014 7:00 am | by Rice Univ.

Graphene may be tough, but those who handle it had better be tender. The environment surrounding the atom-thick carbon material can influence its electronic performance, according to researchers who have come up with a simple way to spot contaminants.

Minuscule Chips Enable Portable Spectroscopy

August 12, 2014 7:00 am | by Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

A team of engineers has created a truly portable device for NMR spectroscopy. They dramatically shrunk the electronic spectrometer components, fitting them on a silicon chip smaller than a sesame seed. Combined with a compact permanent magnet, this minuscule spectrometer represents the smallest device that can presently perform multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.

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